Multicellular organisms in microfluidic systems
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.: Organizers
Prof. Johan Auwerx
Prof. Martin Gijs
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Invited Speakers

 

(Speakers listed alphabetically)


Website

Adela Ben-Yakar

University of Texas, Austin, USA

Biography
Adela Ben-Yakar received her B.S. and M.S. in engineering at the Technion, Israeli Institute of Technology, and her Ph.D. from Stanford University. She completed postdoctoral work in Stanford's department of applied physics and Harvard University's physics department. She is currently an associate professor at the University of Texas, Austin. Her research interests are in ultrafast laser microsurgery, nonlinear microscopy, endoscopic image-guided laser microsurgery, plasmonic laser nanosurgery, multiphoton luminescence imaging, integrated optical and microfluidic platforms for high-throughput whole-animal screening for nerve regeneration and degenerative diseases such Alzheimer’s, and stem cell studies at a single-cell level. She is the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, a National Institutes of Health Director’s Transformative Award and an international award from the Human Frontier Science Program. She is a fellow of the Optical Society (OSA).



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David Biron

Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Biography
David Biron received his PhD in physics from the Weizmann Institute in Israel in 2005, where he worked in the lab of Elisha Moses in the field of soft condensed matter. He conducted his postdoctoral research jointly in the labs of Aravi Samuel at Harvard (Physics) and Piali Sengupta at Brandeis (Biology), working on neural and molecular regulators of thermotaxis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In 2009 David joined the University of Chicago. His lab studies worm sleep – a mysterious phenomenon in and of itself and a model for testing hypotheses regarding the ubiquity and functions of sleep.



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Henrik Bringmann

Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen, Germany

Biography
Henrik Bringmann studied biology in Goettingen and Heidelberg and did his Diploma work at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg. He then did a PhD in cell biology of C. elegans at the Max Planck Institute for Cell biology and Genetics in Dresden. After a Postdoc at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, he became a Max Planck Research Group Leader at the Max Planck institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen. His lab is investigating sleep in C. elegans using microfluidic culture systems.



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Sreekanth Chalasani

Salk Institute, California, USA

Biography
Sreekanth Chalasani completed his PhD degree from the University Pennsylvania in 2003. From 2003 to 2009, he worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of California in San Francisco and the Rockefeller University. Since 2010, Dr Chalasani is an Assistant Professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.



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Nikos Chronis

College of Engineering, University of Michigan, USA

Biography
Dr. Chronis received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Aristotle University (Greece) and University of California at Berkeley in 1998 and 2004 respectively, both in mechanical engineering. In 2004, he worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Cori Bargman’s lab at Rockefeller University (New York). In September of 2006, he joined the faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan. His research interests include in-vivo imaging of neuronal circuits, microfluidics, optical MEMS for lab-on-chip applications and implantable MEMS sensors. He is the recipient of the 2009 NIH Director’s New Innovator Award.



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Matteo Cornaglia

Laboratory of Microsystems, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland

Biography
Matteo Cornaglia is a postdoctoral researcher in the Laboratory of Microsystems held by Prof. Martin Gijs at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland). He graduated summa cum laude from the Polytechnic University of Turin (Italy) with a B.S. in Engineering Physics (2008). He then obtained a M.S. degree in Nanotechnologies, as a joint study agreement between Polytechnic University of Turin, Grenoble Institute of Technology (France) and EPFL, with his Master’s thesis project pursued as part of The Molecular Foundry at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. He received his Ph.D. in Microsystems and Microelectronics (2015) from EPFL. His main research interest is the conception of technological solutions for the automated analysis of C. elegans, as model organism for developmental biology and research on metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases.



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Andrew deMello

Institute for Chemical & Bioengineering, Department of Chemistry & Applied Biosciences, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Biography
Andrew deMello is currently Professor of Biochemical Engineering in the Department of Chemistry at ETH Zurich. Prior to this he was Head of the Nanomaterials and Devices Section in the Department of Chemistry at Imperial College London. His research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. He has published 150 papers in the peer-reviewed literature and given over 200 invited lectures at international meetings in North America, Europe and Asia. His research has been recognized through a number of international awards and prizes including the Corday Morgan Medal (Royal Society of Chemistry, 2009), Clifford Paterson Medal (The Royal Society, 2009), The Clark Memorial Lectureship (California State University, 2007 and the SAC Silver Medal (Royal Society of Chemistry, 2002).



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Andrew Dillin

University of California, Berkeley, USA

Biography
Andrew Dillin is Professor of Genetics, Genomics and Development at University of California, Berkeley where he holds the Thomas and Stacey Siebel Distinguished Chair in Stem Cell Research. Dr. Dillin’s laboratory works on the genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate aging and aging-related disease. The Dillin lab is particularly interested in understanding why an organism begins to lose control over the quality and integrity of its proteins as it ages, and how the recognition of protein misfolding stress is communicated to distal tissues and organs. Dr. Dillin earned his BS in Biochemistry from the University of Nevada. He then moved to study Genetics at UC Berkeley with Dr. Jasper Rine, working on epigenetic regulation of transcription and cell cycle progression. He changed fields for his post-doctoral training and worked with Dr. Cynthia Kenyon at UCSF untangling the genetics of aging. After establishing his lab, he moved into mitochondrial dynamics and proteotoxicity in both worms and mice. He began to ask fundamental questions about proteome maintenance and mitochondrial function in human stem cells. Rising through the ranks to full Professor, Dr. Dillin became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 2008 and is one of the very few full-time biogerontologists to receive the honor.



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Christopher Fang-Yen

Dept. of Neuroscience, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Biography
Christopher Fang-Yen completed his B.S. in physics and mathematics at Stanford University, and his Ph. D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Following postdoctoral fellowships at MIT and Harvard University, he joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania where he is the Wilf Family Term Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering and Assistant Professor in the Department of Neuroscience. Dr. Fang-Yen's research group works at the boundary between engineering and biology: it develops innovative methods, with an emphasis on optical tools, and applies them to address questions in neurobiology and the biology of aging, using the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans as a model.



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Bhagwati Gupta

Dept. Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

Biography
Dr. Gupta is an Associate Professor of Biology at McMaster University. His lab uses nematodes as model organisms to investigate key topics such as cell signaling, and fundamental and applied questions related to human diseases. Prior to joining the McMaster Biology Department, he completed a post-doctoral training at California Institute of Technology in the laboratory of Prof. Paul W. Sternberg. Dr. Gupta has made significant contributions to the fields of C. elegans reproductive system biology, genetic and genomic resources in nematodes, and microfluidic electrotaxis. At McMaster his group is at the cutting edge in using the novel microfluidics platform for integrating and translating engineering, chemical, and neurobiological research.



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Erel Levine

Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

Biography
Erel Levine received his PhD in theoretical physics from the Weizmann Institute in Israel in 2005, where he studied with David Mukamel order-disorder transitions in systems far from equilibrium. He then became a fellow of the Center for Theoretical Biophysics in San Diego, where his focus shifted to physical biology and he started dividing his time between theory and experiment. Together with Terry Hwa and Herbie Levine at UCSD and Leanne Jones at Salk, Erel combined theory and experiment to shed light on the then newly-discovered hidden layer of RNA-based biological regulation. In 2010 Erel started his own lab at Harvard. His lab brings together researchers from a wide range of backgrounds in biology and physics to study the regulation and coordination of response to environmental change, using bacteria and worms as model organisms.



Website

Shawn Lockery

Institute of Neuroscience, University of Oregon, USA

Biography
Shawn Lockery holds a B.A. in Philosophy and Psychology from Yale University. He did post-baccalaureate research in physiology and psychology at Oxford University before obtaining a Ph.D. in Neurobiology from University of California, San Diego. He was a postdoctoral researcher in computational neuroscience at the Salk Institute, and has been a faculty member at the Institute of Neuroscience, University of Oregon since in 1993. Lockery's research focuses on the neuronal basis of spatial orientation and economic decision making in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. He is also co-founder and Chief Technical Officer of NemaMetrix, Inc, a company that develops microfluidic systems for electrophysiological measures of disease, aging, drug resistance and their amelioration nematodes.



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Hang Lu

School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia, USA

Biography
Hang Lu is the Love Family Professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech. She graduated summa cum laude from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1998 with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering. She has a Master's degree in Chemical Engineering Practice(2000), andaPh.D. in Chemical Engineering (2003) from MIT working with Klavs Jensenand Martin Schmidt. She wasa postdoctoral fellowwith CoriBargmannat UCSFand later at the Rockefeller University. Her current research interests are microfluidics and its applications in neurobiology, cell biology, cancer, and biotechnology. Her award and honors include the ACS Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award, a National Science Foundation CAREER award, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, a DuPont Young Professor Award, a DARPA Young Faculty Award, Council of Systems Biology in Boston (CSB2) Prize in Systems Biology, and a Georgia Tech Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award; she was also named an MIT Technology Review TR35 top innovator, and invited to give the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Van Ness Award Lectures in 2011, and the Saville Lecture at Princeton in 2013. She is an elected fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and an elected fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).



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Coleen T. Murphy

Professor, Lewis-Sigler Institute of Integrative Genomics and Dept. of Molecular Biology
Director, Glenn Center for Quantitative Aging Research at Princeton, NJ, USA

Biography
Coleen T. Murphy is a Professor of Genomics and Molecular Biology at Princeton University, and isthe Director of the Glenn Center for Quantitative Aging Research at Princeton University. She graduated from the University of Houston with a B.S. in Biochemistry and Biophysics, then earned her doctorate in Biochemistry at Stanford University, studying the structure-function determinants of pre-steady state kinetics and motility of the motor protein myosin.
Dr. Murphy became interested in applying new technologies to approach the question of aging, and during her postdoctoral work in Dr. Cynthia Kenyon's lab (UCSF), she builtC. elegansmicroarrays and used them to identify the set of genes downstream of the insulin signaling/FOXO longevity pathway. This work revealed that insulin signaling coordinates the expression of a vast array of downstream cellular processes, including stress response, proteostasis, metabolism, immunity, autophagy, and intercellular signaling, to extend cellular and organismal maintenance with age.
In her own lab, Dr. Murphy's team has developedC. elegansmodels of human “quality of life” aging phenotypes, such as cognitive aging and reproductive aging, developing new assays and molecular techniques to study these processes. They have found that aging processes are remarkably well-conserved from worms to humans at the molecular level, and they have identified genetic pathways that can extend these processes with age. Recently, Dr. Murphy's lab made the surprising discovery that mating induces rapid post-reproductive aging, utilizing the same genetic pathways that extend longevity.
As a faculty member, Dr. Murphy has been nameda Sloan Fellow, Pew Scholar, Ellison New Scholar, Basil O'Connor Scholar, McKnight Scholar, and Keck Scholar, and is the recipient of the NIH's New InnovatorandPioneer Awards.



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Aravinthan Samuel

Department of Physics & Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

Biography
Aravi Samuel received his BA in physics in 1993 and PhD in biophysics in 1999 from Harvard University where he studied bacterial locomotion and behavior with Howard C. Berg. Since 2003 in his own lab in the Department of Physics and Center for Brain Science at Harvard, he has studied the neural circuits for locomotion and behavior in nematodes and Drosophila larvae. His lab uses quantitative behavioral analysis, light, and electron microscopy to unravel the computations for navigational behavior and their underpinnings in the small circuits of these surprisingly sophisticated animals.



Website

Michael Unser

Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL)
Biomedical Imaging Group
Switzerland

Biography
Michael Unser is professor and director ofEPFL's Biomedical Imaging Group, Lausanne,Switzerland. His primary areaof investigation is biomedical image processing. He isinternationallyrecognized for his research contributions to sampling theory, wavelets,the use ofsplines for image processing, stochastic processes, andcomputational bioimaging. He haspublished over 250 journal paperson those topics.

From 1985 to 1997, he was with the BiomedicalEngineering and Instrumentation Program,National Institutes ofHealth, Bethesda USA, conducting research on bioimaging.

Dr. Unser has held the position of associateEditor-in-Chief (2003-2005) for the IEEETransactions on Medical Imaging. He is currentlymember of the editorial boards of SIAM J.Imaging Sciences, IEEE J. SelectedTopics in Signal Processing, and Foundations and Trends inSignalProcessing. He co-organized the first IEEE International Symposium on BiomedicalImaging (ISBI'2002) and was the founding chair of the technical committee ofthe IEEE-SPSociety on Bio Imaging and Signal Processing (BISP).

Prof. Unser is a fellow of the IEEE (1999), anEURASIP fellow (2009), and a member of theSwiss Academy of Engineering Sciences.He is the recipient of several international prizesincluding three IEEE-SPSBest Paper Awards and two Technical Achievement Awards from theIEEE (2008SPS and EMBS 2010).

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